WIMF 2015: A QUEEN'S JOURNAL REVIEW THE FESTIVAL THE ARTISTS PHOTOS & REVIEWS THE PARTY BOAT THE FOOD THE DIRECTOR
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ruben kalaichandran
kia kortelainen
sebastian leck
lauren luchenski
mishal omar
krishna patel
anisa rawhani
ramna safeer
kayla thomson © The Queen's Journal 2015
THE DIRECTOR Words by Lauren Luchenski
The best part about this [festival] is Virginia. She’s the best. When I think of Wolfe Island I think instantly of her smiling face which greets us every time we get here. I mean I probably wouldn’t have ever been to Wolfe Island if it wasn’t for Virginia. Bryan Webb, frontman for the Constantines

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She’s incredible. She’s our fairy godmother. She sent us a Facebook message as we were studying for our exams and it made us incredibly happy. Adam Noble Marks, bassist for The Attic Kids

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Virginia Clark.
Journal File Photo
Virginia Clark is the head and the heart behind the Wolfe Island Music Festival (WIMF). She's the artistic director, co-founder and coordinator of WIMF rolled into one. She oversees the festival’s planning, from booking bands to signage, to ensure that every aspect of the festival is ready. For 10 years, Clark has curated the line-up for WIMF, which ultimately decides the bands that will play and the vibe of the festival. Clark has also been the General Manager of The Grad Club for 15 years. During her time as the general manager, The Grad Club has become a prominent music venue in Ontario, hosting bands like Joel Plaskett, Feist, and Broken Social Scene. She has also started new musical events for Queen’s students, including QPOP and Isabel Goes Alt. Clark’s musical touch has changed The Grad Club’s reputation along with Kingston’s. She has used other local venues, such as Sydenham Street United Church and Alehouse, to host 
big-name bands like Modest Mouse and Dan Mangan. Although Clark describes herself a rock-and-roll girl, she says it’s impossible to pinpoint her exact musical taste. “It’s hard to describe my taste [in music], especially when I like so many different flavours!” Clark, ArtSci ’94, said. For Clark, planning WIMF is hardly work. She says she does it out of love of her community and the artists that play at the festival. “It’s a work of love, for sure,” Clark said. “I wouldn’t be doing it if I didn’t love it.” Clark grew up in Battersea, a small town just north of Kingston. She moved to Kingston to study sociology and philosophy at Queen’s. After university, Clark moved to Vancouver, but she says she didn’t seem to fall quite into step with the bustling city. Twenty years ago, Clark returned to Kingston during vacation to visit friends on Wolfe Island. She fell in love with the relaxing and welcoming island and has lived there ever since. “You know when you live somewhere and you go away for awhile, but you’re always thinking about that one place? That’s Wolfe Island for me,” Clark said. “It’s one of my favourite places in the world.” Clark said she has always valued feeling that she’s connected to her community — no matter where she is. She gives the festival’s proceeds to Wolfe Island’s community centre to honour her connection to the island’s community. This year, Clark said she’s most excited for the festival’s 
line-up, although not necessarily for the music. “Some of the artists that are coming I would call friends. Constantines, the headliners, [are] one of them. They’ve played at the Grad Club many times and I’ve known them for many years,” she said. Although Clark connects socially with artists, venues and students on a daily basis, she’s a more solitary person in her free time. She said she enjoys relaxing on Wolfe Island, exploring the outdoors and gardening. “I just love being outdoors and I just sort of hang low,” Clark said. “I’m not the social butterfly that everyone thinks I am.” Clark also attends her fair share of music festivals. This year, she’s most excited for Riverfest Elora and Toronto Urban Roots Fest.